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msealey

Burst.net

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In the last couple of months I've had a huge spike of muck from burst.net and their parent/affiliate (?) company/companies, HostNoc, Nocster etc

Anyone found a way to stop it, please?

I have aggressive SpamAssassin settings and am reporting it all here to SpamCop.

Have also complained formally to Pennsylvania Secretary of State.

Include their 'ceo', shawn[at]burst.net, in my emails.

Anyone had more success than this, please?

TIA!

:angry:

Edited by msealey

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<snip>

Anyone found a way to stop it, please?

Hi, Mark,

...S pam can not be stopped by us victims, only by the admins of the machines through which they are sent. If those admins are indifferent or actively favorable to the spammers, nothing at all can be done except that in rare instances, usually involving very large financial numbers, law enforcement authorities are successfully involved.

...For more on burst.net, please type "burst.net" (with the quotes) into the search field near the top center of this page between the white "button" labeled "Search for -->" and the blue button labeled "GO," press either of the buttons and peruse the articles in the links that are returned.

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Steve,

Thanks; I follow what you say.

Anyone else getting a particularly large quantity from this outfit?

Hi, Mark,

...S pam can not be stopped by us victims, only by the admins of the machines through which they are sent…

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Steve,

Thanks; I follow what you say.

Anyone else getting a particularly large quantity from this outfit?

YES!

Maybe 8 to 10 per day. I finally started faxing the reports to them, but I think they banned my number after two days.

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That's actually all very helpful - thanks!

I can now see that the 'front' they put up about an AUP and assiduously following up on spam, not to mention the proper services they claim to supply to supposedly happy customers is so much eyewash :unsure: .

Is there really any point to reporting them, though?

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That's actually all very helpful - thanks!

I can now see that the 'front' they put up about an AUP and assiduously following up on spam, not to mention the proper services they claim to supply to supposedly happy customers is so much eyewash :unsure: .

Is there really any point to reporting them, though?

The best defense is attack

AND you get better at it

In this group try to give an IP or a SC tracking URL for better advice

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The best defense is attack

AND you get better at it

In this group try to give an IP or a SC tracking URL for better advice

I've been getting over 20 emails per day that originate from burst.net

They mostly hit the spam folder in gmail but when I realized 95% of my spam was coming from burst.net servers it pissed me off and I've been reporting to Spamcop on a daily basis. Here are some ip addresses along with the report ID for verification.

BURST.NET report ID's and IP addresses:

6029743192 ( 64.120.248.215 )

6029743144 ( 64.191.86.59 )

6029743097 ( 64.120.169.181 )

6029743093 ( 184.82.70.210 )

6029743087 ( 64.120.222.199 )

6029743084 ( 184.82.69.183 )

6029743077 ( 184.82.69.173 )

6029743068 ( 64.120.222.93 )

6029743049 ( 64.120.248.201 )

6029742777 ( 64.191.86.38 )

6029742698 ( 184.82.70.249 )

6029742665 ( 64.120.235.247 )

These are all just in the last 24 hours.

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Yes, that's quite a range of networks and disparate servers (though tracking URLs might have been better in this instance - only you and SC staff can see those details from the Report IDs without quite a bit of work):

# IP Address Network CIDR Alloc Resolved Name
1 64.120.248.215 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes familyrollins.localcentimeter.com
2 64.191.86.59 HOSTNOC-3BLK 64.191.0.0/17 Yes vpn2.daygey.com
3 64.120.169.181 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes chsfsc.erswise.com
4 184.82.70.210 HOSTNOC-8BLK 184.82.0.0/16 Yes jdsinternet.topvolcanic.com
5 64.120.222.199 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes fl2000-edge001.podtablet.com
6 184.82.69.183 HOSTNOC-8BLK 184.82.0.0/16 Yes newnjo2.oddenergykas.com
7 184.82.69.173 HOSTNOC-8BLK 184.82.0.0/16 Yes drivefinancial.ribsraw.com
8 64.120.222.93 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes clogdancing.grimaceboa.com
9 64.120.248.201 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes cfln.beneathboo.com
10 64.191.86.38 HOSTNOC-3BLK 64.191.0.0/17 Yes goriley.pixbap.com
11 184.82.70.249 HOSTNOC-8BLK 184.82.0.0/16 Yes 184-82-70-249.static.hostnoc.net
12 64.120.235.247 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes 64-120-235-247.static.hostnoc.net

Have to wonder what is going on ...

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Hard not to wonder if they are simply a spam haven. At a certain point law enforcement or whatever should just shut them down...

Still getting 20 or so emails that originate from their servers every day, like this batch. I don't report all of them but about once a week I report two day's worth.

Yes, that's quite a range of networks and disparate servers (though tracking URLs might have been better in this instance - only you and SC staff can see those details from the Report IDs without quite a bit of work):

1 64.120.248.215 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes familyrollins.localcentimeter.com
2 64.191.86.59 HOSTNOC-3BLK 64.191.0.0/17 Yes vpn2.daygey.com
3 64.120.169.181 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes chsfsc.erswise.com
4 184.82.70.210 HOSTNOC-8BLK 184.82.0.0/16 Yes jdsinternet.topvolcanic.com
5 64.120.222.199 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes fl2000-edge001.podtablet.com
6 184.82.69.183 HOSTNOC-8BLK 184.82.0.0/16 Yes newnjo2.oddenergykas.com
7 184.82.69.173 HOSTNOC-8BLK 184.82.0.0/16 Yes drivefinancial.ribsraw.com
8 64.120.222.93 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes clogdancing.grimaceboa.com
9 64.120.248.201 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes cfln.beneathboo.com
10 64.191.86.38 HOSTNOC-3BLK 64.191.0.0/17 Yes goriley.pixbap.com
11 184.82.70.249 HOSTNOC-8BLK 184.82.0.0/16 Yes 184-82-70-249.static.hostnoc.net
12 64.120.235.247 HOSTNOC-5BLK 64.120.128.0/17 Yes 64-120-235-247.static.hostnoc.net

Have to wonder what is going on ...

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<snip>

At a certain point law enforcement or whatever should just shut them down...

<snip>

...No, they shouldn't, because spam isn't against the law. One can only hope that law enforcement and judicial systems will eventually come to recognize that spam is theft of network and e-mail provider resources and then learn how to properly measure the losses from that theft.

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...No, they shouldn't, because spam isn't against the law. One can only hope that law enforcement and judicial systems will eventually come to recognize that spam is theft of network and e-mail provider resources and then learn how to properly measure the losses from that theft.

Does this qualify as against the law?

http://www.business.ftc.gov/documents/bus6...-guide-business

AN-spam Act: A Compliance Guide for Business

Each separate email in violation of the CAN-spam Act is subject to penalties of up to $16,000, so non-compliance can be costly. But following the law isn’t complicated. Here’s a rundown of CAN-spam’s main requirements:

Don’t use false or misleading header information. Your “From,†“To,†“Reply-To,†and routing information – including the originating domain name and email address – must be accurate and identify the person or business who initiated the message.

Don’t use deceptive subject lines. The subject line must accurately reflect the content of the message.

Identify the message as an ad. The law gives you a lot of leeway in how to do this, but you must disclose clearly and conspicuously that your message is an advertisement.

Tell recipients where you’re located. Your message must include your valid physical postal address. This can be your current street address, a post office box you’ve registered with the U.S. Postal Service, or a private mailbox you’ve registered with a commercial mail receiving agency established under Postal Service regulations.

Tell recipients how to opt out of receiving future email from you. Your message must include a clear and conspicuous explanation of how the recipient can opt out of getting email from you in the future. Craft the notice in a way that’s easy for an ordinary person to recognize, read, and understand. Creative use of type size, color, and location can improve clarity. Give a return email address or another easy Internet-based way to allow people to communicate their choice to you. You may create a menu to allow a recipient to opt out of certain types of messages, but you must include the option to stop all commercial messages from you. Make sure your spam filter doesn’t block these opt-out requests.

Honor opt-out requests promptly. Any opt-out mechanism you offer must be able to process opt-out requests for at least 30 days after you send your message. You must honor a recipient’s opt-out request within 10 business days. You can’t charge a fee, require the recipient to give you any personally identifying information beyond an email address, or make the recipient take any step other than sending a reply email or visiting a single page on an Internet website as a condition for honoring an opt-out request. Once people have told you they don’t want to receive more messages from you, you can’t sell or transfer their email addresses, even in the form of a mailing list. The only exception is that you may transfer the addresses to a company you’ve hired to help you comply with the CAN-spam Act.

Monitor what others are doing on your behalf. The law makes clear that even if you hire another company to handle your email marketing, you can’t contract away your legal responsibility to comply with the law. Both the company whose product is promoted in the message and the company that actually sends the message may be held legally responsible.

Edited by mysoulishome

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Does this qualify as against the law?

<snip>

...It might if they are subject to that law and violating its provisions but the law does not provide for what you are suggesting that law enforcement should do:
<snip>

law enforcement or whatever should just shut them down...

<snip>

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...It might if they are subject to that law and violating its provisions but the law does not provide for what you are suggesting that law enforcement should do:

OK, fine the sh** out of them then haha I don't care... There are plenty of spammers in prison for various offenses as well.

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