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noone_here

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About noone_here

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  1. small ones (single spams) seem to get through, of larger ones 10-100k in size most disappear in the ether, submissions sent from both corporate, hotmail and yehoo accounts, no apparent pattern there. MX needs a kick?
  2. noone_here

    Whole country banned

    ... mailserver doesn't get listed because it identifies the ip of the sender, Well in a way that's too bad, because mailservers with weak spam prevention get off scot free. I'm dealing with some **head in Verzon space POPing his viruses and spam to me through Yahoo, no one cares, it's not yahoos IP and it;s not Verizons mailer
  3. noone_here

    Solomon Islands

    I've come to the conclusion that the only thing that works to reduce spam is blocklists and SMTP rejects. I lose more good mail trying to sift through hundreds of pieces of spam every day, than i would through blocking, and SMTP rejects at least let legitimate senders know about the problem, without penalizing innoncents in the from line of spam. Most Ip's only treat their spam problem as a part time annoyance, if their customers are sreriously blocked they actually might act and take their own spammer problems seriously. People suffering rejects can always resort to hotmail, yahoo and the like. Believe me if comcast was blocked by a number of big isp's their spam problem would be solved. spam filters simply don;t work, you still have to either ignore your junk folder or plough through it for false positives, which is no better than sorting through the InBox. Most users now already pretty much filter on a whitelist basis, so the inbox and junkbox are essentially equivalent.
  4. noone_here

    Solomon Islands

    I've come to the conclusion that the only thing that works to reduce spam is blocklists and SMTP rejects. I lose more good mail trying to sift through hundreds of pieces of spam every day, than i would through blocking, and SMTP rejects at least let legitimate senders know about the problem, without penalizing innoncents in the from line of spam. Most Ip's only treat their spam problem as a part time annoyance, if their customers are sreriously blocked they actually might act and take their own spammer problems seriously. People suffering rejects can always resort to hotmail, yahoo and the like. Believe me if comcast was blocked by a number of big isp's their spam problem would be solved. spam filters simply don;t work, you still have to either ignore your junk folder or plough through it for false positives, which is no better than sorting through the InBox. Most users now already pretty much filter on a whitelist basis, so the inbox and junkbox are essentially equivalent.
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