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Translation Job Scams


cppgenius
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Hi there, I've been investigating one of those translation services spam e-mails and I really can't see what's the catch. I've been scambaiting this one asian guy for quite some time now and the only thing I have learned so far is that the translation scammers do not want to share any personal contact information like telephone numbers and addresses, whereas the real translators list a lot of contact information on the web.

Most of these translator profiles seems to be copied from www.translatorscafe.com. Is anyone familiar with this site, is the translators listed on this site legit or are these guys a bunch of swindlers as well?

It is easy to see that the scammers simply copied the information on this site, removed the telephone numbers and replaced the e-mail addresses. Most of the times when the translator is John.Doe[at]gmail.com, the scammer will create a similar hotmail account, for example John.Doe[at]hotmail.com

Another thing that's odd to me, how do these scammers expect to receive payment, by threatening you to pay up. What is stopping you from asking the scammer to translate something and then refuse to pay, what's the scammer gonna do, sue you? Where is the catch.

I'll appreciate any insight on this matter, especially someone who have first hand experience with these swindlers.

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<snip>

Another thing that's odd to me, how do these scammers expect to receive payment, by threatening you to pay up. What is stopping you from asking the scammer to translate something and then refuse to pay, what's the scammer gonna do, sue you? Where is the catch.

<snip>

...You mean they deliver the translation first and then ask for payment? If that's the case, then I guess they have to rely on good will or threats. This might just be an example of Spammer Rules #3 (especially Spinosa's Corollary) and #4. :) <g>
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...You mean they deliver the translation first and then ask for payment? If that's the case, then I guess they have to rely on good will or threats. This might just be an example of Spammer Rules #3 (especially Spinosa's Corollary) and #4. :) <g>

I haven't been able to confirm this, but it would make more sense to me if they demanded payment upfront. I guess they will first quote you on the amount of words to be translated.

Back to the scammer, I will see what happens if I send him something to translate...

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