Jump to content

Lottery spam


Farelf
 Share

Recommended Posts

Most of the phony "There is a winning ticket with your name on it" stuff I've seen fails to explain just how that unlikely event has occurred. Therefore only those who are terminally hopeful or who happen to have actually taken tickets in something resembling the purported draw (overlapping sets, perhaps) are likely to be fooled for an instant. I'm no spam reader but from the source this one YOUR URGENT CONSENT IS NEEDED!!! appears to be trying a half-way feasible explanation for the rest of us - a Micro$soft promotion, as attested by the worthy "Mrs. Sandra Mark Online coordinator for MICROSOFT UK ON-LINE PROMOTIONS." This is hardly new - a touch of Googling reveals numerous examples have been collected - it is just that it is the first one sent to me. There are all sorts of defects in this document (an excessive number of exclamation points for a start) but the point is it has raised the stakes by offereing just a hint of plausibility to a broader public.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of the phony "There is a winning ticket with your name on it" stuff I've seen fails to explain just how that unlikely event has occurred. ((snip))

I have pages on my website (URL in my sig below) devoted to both lottery scams and drug spamming (the Yambo crew specifically). Last week I received two e-mails on these.

The first was from someone who wanted me to tell him how one might tell whether a lottery e-mail was REAL (since I was at pains to explain how you could tell that these might be NOT REAL). (I advised him not to believe ANY of them). The writer had gone so far as to initiate correspondence with the scammer, and attached a very woeful-looking knocked-off "certificate of authenticity." I could not tell whether the scammer had actually put on the bite yet, or whether my correspondent had fallen for it.

The other mail was from someone who almost placed an order with MyCanadianPharmacy until they googled it and saw my page; he was thanking me for the warning.

The point of all this is that one can imagine how many more people fall for these things and then either don't do their "due diligence" or are reluctant to tell anyone that they were had.

-- rick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The point of all this is that one can imagine how many more people fall for these things and then either don't do their "due diligence" or are reluctant to tell anyone that they were had.

The recent post here on the woman dying from ingesting strontium/uranium contaminated pills bought on line is quite revealing....

you just have to wonder how much longer these criminals are going to be allowed to operate unhindered..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...