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mars

my mail system is blocked by scbl

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Your analogies aren't comparing "apples to oranges" -- they're "apples to hedgehogs." In other words....bunk!

Here's the deal...China, the country, heavy handed oppressive government that they are, could easliy take some agressive measures to clean up their spamming and especially their spammer hosting problem, but they haven't.

Bad neighborhoods, on the other hand aren't as simple to deal with from a governmental level, so your entire post is nonsensical.

If China, as an entire country, was digitally ostracized/disconnected from the 'Net until they took serious action, the entire 'Net would benefit. It's gotten that bad. We can't just sit around and wait for something to happen.

DT

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Bad neighborhoods, on the other hand aren't as simple to deal with from a governmental level, so your entire post is nonsensical.

..of course it is, he is becoming the resident troll and as such no longer deserves attention!

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Bad neighborhoods, on the other hand aren't as simple to deal with from a governmental level, so your entire post is nonsensical.
..of course it is, he is becoming the resident troll and as such no longer deserves attention!

27240[/snapback]

...Then count me among the trolls, as I largely agree with WisTex.

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Not you Steve. But I do hate circular arguments and beating on dead horses. If you made your point once why go over the same arguments ad nauseum?

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In ghetto neighborhoods when the ones who are decent get together, they do change things.

In addition, building a wall around China by blocking known spam providers is not the same as building a wall around a ghetto. For one thing, there are web mail addresses that the 'innocent' people can use. And for another thing, there may be some providers in China who do not allow spam. I actually got a reply to a report which I held onto for a long time to see whether it was like the ones from Korea that mean nothing, but I never did get another spam from that Chinese provider.

Again, it is only when the 'innocent' people take action that things change. Being a part of a community requires responsibility. Personal responsibility in not littering or spamming. And also community responsibility by supporting each other, joining with others to create a better community, and by voting. The way that email users can vote is with their selection of an Internet provider and by complaining and campaigning for better customer service.

It is not always easy to be a responsible citizen. It sometimes requires sacrifice of time and money. And sometimes, circumstances dictate that one has to live in the ghetto and everything is harder to do, but with determination one can still do them. Yes, it would be nice if everyone got what they deserved in life (though sometimes I am glad I don't). But the best that we can do is to work with reality. In the email world, that is spam. And using blocklists is the least censoring and other negative qualities of filtering and most in conjunction with the ideals of a useful and accessible internet where all are welcome who want to use it without harming others. Blocking doesn't even prevent anyone from using the internet; it only stops inconsiderate people from invading my space. If someone doesn't want to be inconsiderate, then h/she can find another way to contact me.

Miss Betsy

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Just because you disagree with me doesn't make me a troll. I am just pointing out where policies and attitudes are not fair or discriminating. Some will agree with me, some won't care... until the shoe is on the other foot and they get harmed for something they didn't do.

One thing that might help is if SpamCop.net and other Anti-spam Organizations were more international oriented (i.e. multiple languages, etc.). If we could enlist people from various countries to contribute to the effort, and provide support to ISPs and businesses in their language, we might be able to make a bigger dent in international spam.

Legitimate e-mailers and legitimate ISPs, as you say, have a responsibility and a vested interest in keeping the internet spam free and keeping themselves off the blacklists. But right now anyone who doesn't know English would have a hard time getting off a list, getting support and possibly even knowing they are on a list to begin with.

Even think of creating an international coalition vs. being primarily an English only organization?

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<snip>

One thing that might help is if SpamCop.net and other Anti-spam Organizations were more international oriented (i.e. multiple languages, etc.).  If we could enlist people from various countries to contribute to the effort, and provide support to ISPs and businesses in their language, we might be able to make a bigger dent in international spam.

Legitimate e-mailers and legitimate ISPs, as you say, have a responsibility and a vested interest in keeping the internet spam free and keeping themselves off the blacklists.  But right now anyone who doesn't know English would have a hard time getting off a list, getting support and possibly even knowing they are on a list to begin with.

Even think of creating an international coalition vs. being primarily an English only organization?

27274[/snapback]

...That's kind of a Catch-22 situation ... very few here know a language other than English, so we not only can't provide support in a language other than English, we can't reach out to "internationalize" the SpamCop initiative. And I don't think that "problem" is limited only to SpamCop -- it seems that English is the "language of the internet," much as it is the language of air travel (if for not as good a reason...).

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...That's kind of a Catch-22 situation ... very few here know a language other than English, so we not only can't provide support in a language other than English, we can't reach out to "internationalize" the SpamCop initiative.  And I don't think that "problem" is limited only to SpamCop -- it seems that English is the "language of the internet," much as it is the language of air travel (if for not as good a reason...).

27281[/snapback]

I've seen other organizations successfully do it and it has increased the reach of their organizations tremendously. What they did was enlist volunteers to help translate the website, and then oversaw the implementation of that. It's not undoable, but it would require some coordination and soliciting help.

I think it would be better to have a responsible spam blacklist like this one (who actually is responsible about what they list and what they don't) have international presence and clout, rather than have hundreds of country and language-specific blacklists, many of which are not that responsible.

English, without a doubt, is an international language, but there are still billions of people who don't speak it.

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I think that is a great idea. I wouldn't object if there were multilingual threads. And definitely to have another Steve or John or Merlyn to explain things in other languages.

And a couple more to translate if there were something that interest the entire group.

So far, it doesn't seem to be a popular idea. I think possibly if someone is struggling and someone else can help, they take it to private email.

Miss Betsy

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